Supermoon in the Wimmera: did you spot it? | Photos

MANY people gazed eagerly at the skies on Monday night to catch a glimpse of the supermoon.

But unfortunately, many Wimmera peopleÔÇÖs efforts were hindered by a cloudy night.

How was the view from your place?

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From Sydney to Washington DC, spectators looked up to the skies to catch sight of the brightest moon in almost 69 years.

Bad weather frustrated many Victorians last night, with cloud cover impacting views of the supermoon.

Can we see it again?

There will not be another supermoon - like the one the rest of the country saw on Monday - until November 25, 2034. But there will be another supermoon next month, albeit not at perigee. December's supermoon will occur on the 14th, when the moon's orbit will place it 360,390 kilometres from Earth ÔÇô 3837 kilometres further away from us than November's supermoon.

What were we looking for?

Keen-eyed observers would have been able to pick out lunar landmarks. The maria, the moon's low-lying seas, are the darker patches. Apollo 11's famous landing site is on the easterly edge of the Sea of Tranquility. The Tycho crater and Copernicus crater are the lighter-coloured circles. Remember, too, that we see the moon "upside down" compared to those in the northern hemisphere.

What is a supermoon anyway?

A supermoon occurs when you have a combination of two things: a full moon and the moon at perigee ÔÇô the point in its orbit when it is approaching Earth at its closest. On November 14, this will bring the moon 50,000 kilometres closer to Earth.

Why was this one so special?

This wasn't just any supermoon. This monster appeared up to 14 per cent bigger and 30 per cent brighter than an average full moon, for those who could see it. It was the biggest one is almost 70 years. This is because the moon is, astronomically speaking, close to Earth at a mere 356,553 kilometres away. It'll be 18 years until it's this close to us again.

This story Supermoon in the Wimmera: did you spot it? | Photos first appeared on The Wimmera Mail-Times.