Higher prices make livestock theft more tempting

Anecdotal reports from Upper Hunter on sightings of vehicles carrying sophisticated equipment capable of trapping and removing sheep and goats highlights the risks posed and how quickly and easily stock can be stolen.

MISSING: A three week old stud Brahman calf Kirby taken from an Upper Hunter property in late June.

MISSING: A three week old stud Brahman calf Kirby taken from an Upper Hunter property in late June.

Last month Upper Hunter resident Haley Ellis, Buckaroo Brahmans, suspects one of her stud calves “Kirby” was snatched from a property, just north of Murrurundi.

Kirby, a three-week-old calf and one of only two of its kind in Australia, 

“Someone’s wanted a poddy calf and stole her,” she said.

“You can see the marks at the fence where they dragged Kirby under.

“She has a microchip in her belly and her DNA is also on file.”

Hunter Local Area Command’s Chief Inspector Guy Guiana said fortunately there had been no drastic increase in stock thefts during the past two years.

“We had a look at our incident reports for the region and there were no spikes in the figures however they do show a prevalence for cattle theft over other livestock,” he said.

“The bad news comes from the fact livestock theft is difficult to investigate so we are asking property owners to take precautions including having all stock identified.

“And part from identification one of the best methods especially if you are an absentee landholder is get to know your neighbours.”

Anyone with information on Kirby or concerns/suspicions regarding stolen livestock should contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

This story Be alert as stud calf missing first appeared on The Singleton Argus.