Come ride the heritage train at the Chill Out festival

July 22 come to the annual Chill Out festival and ride the heritage train.

TAKE A TRIP: Tickets cost $15 for adults, $7 for children or $40 for a family ticket. Children under 3 are free (no seat). Take a ride back in time on Saturday at the festival.

TAKE A TRIP: Tickets cost $15 for adults, $7 for children or $40 for a family ticket. Children under 3 are free (no seat). Take a ride back in time on Saturday at the festival.

The Tin Hare heritage train is returning to Gloucester’s Chill Out festival. A huge hit with visitors both young and old, be quick to book your tickets with the Visitor Information Centre ph: 6538 5252 as they will sell quickly.

Often referred to as "Tin Hares", these vehicles were first placed into service in December 1923.

NSW Government Railways introduced the railmotors to provide a feeder service on country branch lines. As train-spotters and train-lovers will tell you, a great train ride is the combination of the scenery outside, the experience inside the cabin and the people you meet on the journey.

“There is so much that makes the trip memorable,” said festival spokesperson, Mel Williams.

“Why don’t you rediscover real train travel at this year’s Chill Out festival, where the journey itself is an adventure.”

Tickets cost $15 for adults, $7 for children or $40 for a family ticket; children under 3 years free (no seat).

Tickets are available at the Visitor Information Centre; go to the chamber website for a timetable and more information: gloucesterchamber.com.au.

Railmotors or ‘Tin Hares’ were so-called as they evolved at the same time as the mechanical lures used in greyhound racing.

The normal seating capacity was 45, with room for 21 passengers in 1st class and 24 in 2nd class. A further seven could be accommodated on the flap seats provided in the guard's compartment, or in the prized seats either side of the driver.

During their lifetime, seating arrangements were modified to suit the work being undertaken, with seats often removed to increase luggage capacity.

As built, they were fitted with petrol engines, the first four (CPH 3-6) receiving a 6-cylinder 75 hp Thornycroft Z6 and the others a 6-cylinder 95 hp Leyland type and a four-speed mechanical transmission controlled by a lever in the cab.

A total of 37 vehicles were built and they operated many branch line services, from Kyogle in the north, to the Riverina in the south, as well as extensively through the Central West regions, until their widespread withdrawal in November 1983 and replacement by road transport.