Stephen powers to second place

Congratulations: Kelly Stock from Office of Environment and Heritage shakes Stephen Hester's hand at the award ceremony as his father, Luke Hester, looks on. Photo: Edwina Richards Photography

Congratulations: Kelly Stock from Office of Environment and Heritage shakes Stephen Hester's hand at the award ceremony as his father, Luke Hester, looks on. Photo: Edwina Richards Photography

Stephen Hester’s film about solar generated power was second in the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) inaugural Pitch’n environmental film competition.

The Gloucester High student’s movie was about the history of solar panels, how they work and the first solar energy project in Gloucester, which involves the installation of solar panels on the Bucketts Way Neighbourhood Centre. 

The competition was designed to encourage young people across the Hunter and Central Coast to think about the future of clean energy and protecting threatened species across NSW. 

Entrants could create at film in either category, Future Energy or Threatened Species. Stephen entered his film in the Future Energy category, making a film that focused on household options for alternative energy.

Pitch’n also provided entrants an opportunity to win a prize for advertising and promotion of the competition via Instagram, where Stephen also won second place. 

Stephen said he entered the competition to see what his film making abilities would be like.

“I really enjoyed the experience and working on the film,” he said.

As part of the presentation, Stephen went to Newcastle where was saw his movie on the big screen as part of the Newcastle Real Film Festival.

“Seeing your own film in a cinema is an amazing experience,” Stephen said.

Mark Squires from OEH said the short film competition attracted a high standard of entries.

“They’re a real credit to their communities,” Mr Squires said.

“It’s so inspiring to see how engaged and passionate they are about protecting their environment.

 Mark Squires and Stephen Hester. Photo. Edwina Richards Photography

Mark Squires and Stephen Hester. Photo. Edwina Richards Photography

“It was a great opportunity for them to share with others their connection to the environment and the change they want to see,” Mr Squires added.

“All the finalists and winning entries interpreted the key themes in unique, intelligent and sometimes humorous ways.” 

Six films were selected as finalists, sharing $8000 in cash and prizes.