St Joseph’s Primary School Gloucester celebrates 100 years of education

Sister Kate Brazier, Sister Ellen Shanahan with students Georgia Morten and Caysha Smith at the celebration. Photo supplied.
Sister Kate Brazier, Sister Ellen Shanahan with students Georgia Morten and Caysha Smith at the celebration. Photo supplied.

St Joseph’s Primary School celebrates 100 years in the Gloucester community

On Saturday March 9, St Joseph’s Primary School celebrated 100 years since the arrival of the sisters of St Joseph and the commencement of Catholic education in Gloucester.

The hot day didn’t deter a wonderful turn out of past and present sisters, principals, teachers, students and families associated with the school as everyone paid tribute to this significant milestone and the unwavering commitment the sisters have made to the school and the community throughout all these years.

The day opened with a beautiful celebration mass coordinated by the school’s principal, Bronwyn Underwood and religious education coordinator, Lee Sullivan.

The students sang and participated in the service and proudly represented the school.

The school and previous convent then opened the doors to welcome everyone for a trip down memory lane, wonderful conversations and reunions of old and new faces.

Catholic Schools Office, Diocese of Maitland/Newcastle director, Gerard Mowbray officially welcomed everyone in attendance and spoke on the important role Catholic schools play in our community.

Mass held at St Joseph;s Church during the day of celebration. Photo supplied.

Mass held at St Joseph;s Church during the day of celebration. Photo supplied.

Records have shown that during the 68 years the sisters resided in Gloucester, more than 90 nuns taught children of Gloucester and the surrounding area.

They experienced the heat of the summer, the coldness of winters here and, in the early days, the distance of being in a small remote town away from their fellow sisters.

The nuns were officially farewelled in December 1987 and even though they may not be an active part of the school today, their legacy is something still held dear.

There has always been a strong sense of community and the sisters were at the heart of it.

Not only were they teachers, they were a big part of many students' and families’ lives during their time here.