The Bloody Long Run has already raised more than $26,000

SPECIAL: Theo Jaynes running a leg during the Bloody Long Run which was raising money for the Alex Gadomski Fellowship. Picture: Supplied
SPECIAL: Theo Jaynes running a leg during the Bloody Long Run which was raising money for the Alex Gadomski Fellowship. Picture: Supplied

On Friday a team of eight runners set off from Eddystone Point in Tasmania's North-East.

Three days and 300 kilometres later they arrived at the University of Tasmania's Menzies Institute for Medical Research in Hobart.

The group was made up of Alex Gadomski's friends and family and was raising money for the Alex Gadomski Fellowship.

The fellowship was set up in 2018 in collaboration with Maddie Reiwoldt's Vision, to help find a cure for bone marrow failure syndrome.

Alex passed away in 2017, at the age of 21, after a five year battle with bone marrow failure.

Theo Jaynes, one of Alex's best mates, said the run was a special experience.

"It was pretty challenging but very rewarding and pretty surreal to be honest," he said.

"The purpose of the whole run made it so worth while and so special.

"Alex had a very tough battle with bone marrow failure syndrome ... the run was so special because we were raising awareness and funds for his fellowship."

Tom Franks and Tim Belstead. Picture: Supplied.

Tom Franks and Tim Belstead. Picture: Supplied.

He said the group originally hoped to raised $10,000 but as of 3 pm Saturday, with donations still open, they had already raised more than $26,000.

"Thanks everyone who has donated and contributed to the Bloody Long Run we are very appreciative and glad we have done it for Alex," Mr Jaynes said.

The money will be used to help fund a PhD scholarship at UTAS's Menzies Institute.

Director Alison Venn said the recipient would work with Dr Kirsten Fairfax researching bone marrow failure.

"Our research at Menzies is very much motivated by making a difference to Tasmanians and the health conditions that affect them," she said.

"Bone marrow failure syndromes are not that common but they can have devastating consequences as it did for Alex.

"We are really pleased to partner with Alex Gadomski's family and Maddie Riewoldt's Vision to really contribute to the global effort to improve outcomes."

Brothers Jordan and Lachlan Gadomski. Picture: Supplied.

Brothers Jordan and Lachlan Gadomski. Picture: Supplied.

She said the more people involved in medical research the better.

"We will not have advances or the kind of breakthroughs that we want to have to improve outcomes without a really strong medical research effort," Professor Venn said.

"That means people and it also means funding for the research itself.

"I said today as people arrived 'their effort has been fantastic in raising money - medical research is often also a bloody long run and it takes a long term effort and a it takes a team'."

Professor Venn thanked the runners for their commitment to the cause.

"I thank the team of runners for braving the elements of winter in Tassie to raise money," she said.

Senior Research Fellow and inaugural recipient of the Alex Gadomski Fellowship, Dr Kirsten Fairfax, said it was an honour to be involved in the fight for a cure.

"Alex's ambition was to find a cure for the disease that took his life at a tragically young age," she said.

"I feel privileged to be able to work with his family and Maddie Riewoldt's Vision to continue his legacy."

This story Eight mates ran 300km in three days for a cause close to their heart first appeared on The Examiner.