Youth Innovation Grant program offers $100,000 in grants for solutions designed by those closest to the issues

Gloucester's Brianna Martin (front row second from left) was part of the 'Taking Control' group at the 2018 ABC Heywire Regional Youth Summit in Canberra. Photo: supplied
Gloucester's Brianna Martin (front row second from left) was part of the 'Taking Control' group at the 2018 ABC Heywire Regional Youth Summit in Canberra. Photo: supplied

The Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR) and ABC Heywire are inviting community groups to apply for grants to implement one of seven ideas developed by some of regional Australia’s brightest young minds and make rural, regional and remote Australia an even better place for young Australians to live.

The FRRR ABC Heywire Youth Innovation Grants are in their sixth year and have already seen more than 70 youth-developed projects implemented in over 140 communities across Australia.

This year, FRRR and its partners are again offering grants of up to $10,000 to rural not-for-profit groups to adopt one of the seven projects developed by 50 young leaders who attended the 2018 ABC Heywire Regional Youth Summit in Canberra.

Together they identified the most pressing issues facing them and conceived unique solutions to tackle them. The project ideas, which are detailed in this booklet, tackle issues:

  • C2C Connecting to Culture –  bringing generations together to celebrate Indigenous culture
  • Bridging AgriCulture – connecting  new Australians with agriculture
  • HOPE – making schools a place where it's ok to talk about mental health
  • Taking Control – teaching young people the difference between a healthy relationship and an unhealthy one
  • Yeah the Boys – supporting boys to stay away from drugs
  • MediFriends – bringing medical professionals and their communities together
  • Step Up – inspiring disengaged young people to take the first step on their journey to success

FRRR CEO, Natalie Egleton, said that these grants allow community groups to pilot projects designed by young people, and address rural and regional challenges through a youth lens.

“The young people who attended the Youth Summit in Canberra were extraordinarily inspiring and passionate about their local communities. While they come from different parts of Australia, many faced the same issues and concerns, and so the projects will no doubt resonate in many other rural, regional and remote communities,” Ms Egleton said.

“By applying for a grant to adopt, adapt and implement one of their ideas, there could be real and lasting change in communities. Best of all, it can connect and involve local young people in creating these solutions. So I encourage all not-for-profit community groups to review the ideas, see if they could make a difference in your community and then apply for up to $10,000 in seed funding.”

Community groups should read the guidelines carefully, and then apply via the FRRR Grants Gateway. Applications close May 14, 2018.

Projects must be implemented in rural, regional or remote Australia.

For more information, visit www.frrr.org.au/heywire. Applicants can also call 1800 170 020.