Groups resisting redress urged to rethink

Scott Morrison has told parliament he wants better outcomes for child sex abuse victims.
Scott Morrison has told parliament he wants better outcomes for child sex abuse victims.

Institutions that have not signed up to the national redress scheme for child sex abuse survivors are facing fresh pressure to do so.

The Morrison government committed an extra $11.7 million to the redress scheme on Tuesday as parliament paused to commemorate one year since child sex abuse survivors received a national apology.

The prime minister said survivors deserve an "ongoing, continuous apology" as well access to adequate compensation.

Scott Morrison also offered a stinging assessment of the institutions who have not joined the redress scheme, saying all they were doing was "doubling down on the crimes and doubling down on the hurt".

"Join," the leader urged institutions. "Do the decent thing, do the right thing, do the honourable thing."

More than 60 non-government institutions or groups are now part of the scheme.

It involves a payment to survivors, access to counselling and a direct personal response, such as an apology, from the responsible institution if the victim chooses.

More than 600 payments had been made through the scheme, totalling more than $50 million.

Average payments have been about $80,000.

Advocates recently described the $3.8 billion national scheme as frustrating, slow and difficult.

"I want better outcomes," Mr Morrison said.

Australian Associated Press